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24Hr Electrician Blogs Blog to learn about electrician services in your area and best tips for DIY electrical work. http://news-round.com/feeds/1675741225-24hr-electrician-blogs Mon, 02 Aug 2021 01:18:56 +0000 -33.859749 151.202637 city is-centered-at Sydney The Plumber – 2019 http://24hrelectrician.com.au Tue, 20 Jul 2021 05:06:07 +0000 http://24hrelectrician.com.au How to Become an Electrician: 5 Easy To Follow Steps https://intercoast.edu/blog/become-an-electrician/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 05:06:09 +0000 https://intercoast.edu/blog/become-an-electrician/ Electricians : Occupational Outlook Handbook: : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/electricians.htm Tue, 20 Jul 2021 05:06:09 +0000 https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/electricians.htm Fuel Loading Only Major Milestone Left for Vogtle Unit 3 Nuclear Project https://www.powermag.com/fuel-loading-only-major-milestone-left-for-vogtle-unit-3-nuclear-project/ Fri, 30 Jul 2021 13:31:10 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165982 The post Fuel Loading Only Major Milestone Left for Vogtle Unit 3 Nuclear Project appeared first on POWER Magazine.


Tom Fanning, CEO of Southern Company, reported during the company’s earnings call on July 29 that hot functional testing (HFT) had been completed on Vogtle Unit 3, and that the “next and final major milestone” is fuel load. “We project fuel load to occur sometime near year-end 2021 or early in 2022,” he said. The […]

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The post Fuel Loading Only Major Milestone Left for Vogtle Unit 3 Nuclear Project appeared first on POWER Magazine.

Tom Fanning, CEO of Southern Company, reported during the company’s earnings call on July 29 that hot functional testing (HFT) had been completed on Vogtle Unit 3, and that the “next and final major milestone” is fuel load. “We project fuel load to occur sometime near year-end 2021 or early in 2022,” he said.

The Vogtle nuclear power plant expansion project includes the addition of two new Westinghouse AP1000 reactors—Units 3 and 4 at a site near Waynesboro, Georgia, that has two existing units. (Unit 1 began operation in 1987 and Unit 2 began operation in 1989.) The project is owned by four partners—Southern Company subsidiary Georgia Power (45.7%), Oglethorpe Power Corp. (30%), Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia (MEAG Power, 22.7%), and Dalton Utilities (1.6%).

Construction on Unit 3 and 4 has been a long, drawn-out process. Southern Nuclear (a subsidiary of Southern Company) filed for an early site permit (ESP) application with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in August 2006. Southern Nuclear, with the help of NuStart Energy Development LLC, submitted original and supplemental combined construction and operating license (COL) applications in 2008 and 2009. Construction of the two AP1000 reactors was approved by the Georgia Public Service Commission in March 2009, and the NRC approved the ESP and limited work authorization in August 2009. The COLs for Units 3 and 4 were approved in February 2012.

Contractor Changes

Several contractor changes have occurred over the years, including from The Shaw Group to CB&I to Fluor to Southern Nuclear and Bechtel. Original costs have escalated and timelines have been modified, including Unit 3 and 4 in-service dates being extended most recently from November 2021 and November 2022, to second-quarter 2022 and first-quarter 2023, respectively. Still, the completion of HFT on Unit 3 is a key milestone toward completion.

This July 2021 photo shows construction continuing, along with demobilization of the Lampson crane, at the site of the Vogtle nuclear power plant expansion in Waynesboro, Georgia. Courtesy: Georgia Power

“Through testing, we have validated the operation of critical primary and secondary systems at full temperature and pressure, and demonstrated that the design basis is sound. The completion of hot functional testing marks the last major milestone before fuel loading and represent a significant step towards placing Unit 3 in service,” Fanning said.

Georgia Power’s share of the total project capital cost forecast increased by $460 million in the quarter reported on Thursday. Fanning said that was largely driven by “our updated schedule, recent productivity trends, and replenishment of contingency to fund expected future risks.”

Fanning pointed to four items that would affect the timing of fuel loading. “One, completion of the nuclear fuel systems and the associated documentation—or paper, as I referred to it in the past. Two, completion of remediation work and additional work identified during hot functional testing. Three, completion of the work necessary to implement our plant support systems. And four, a reduction in productivity levels consistent with recent site performance.”

Lessons Learned

Fanning suggested that lessons learned from hot functional testing in China, where the first commercial AP1000 units are in operation at the Sanmen and Haiyang facilities, was helpful for the team at Vogtle. “I want to say it was the first unit that went through HFT in China [that] actually had to re-perform their HFT. So, they had significant operational issues concerning vibrations and a variety of other things, and that took over six months. We have passed through those issues—we learned from them and from the issues they experienced—our plant worked great. So, we are as we thought we would be,” he said. Although HFT took longer than Southern Company had expected, Fanning said the company remains “committed to getting it right for all aspects of the project.”

In the meantime, Fanning said work is progressing as planned. Using an automobile analogy, he explained, “Now that we’ve completed HFT effectively, we take the car, and lift the hood, and look at the engine, and see what happened. The experience in China showed that there shouldn’t be any big things happen—that’s our experience in China—but certainly, that’s an important part of work.”

Southern Company reported that Unit 4 was approximately 84% complete and had achieved initial energization in May. The need to extend the in-service date to the first quarter of 2023 was said to have been caused by several factors. Among them were slower than expected recovery from pandemic-related staffing reductions in early 2020, the delay in Unit 3’s HFT slowed plans to transition resources to Unit 4, and difficulty attracting and retaining skilled labor, especially electricians.

Notably, Fanning said Unit 4 was now on an independent track from Unit 3. “In prior earnings calls, we talked about an optimal relationship is nine months and 12 months. We have stopped the idea. It no longer is applicable to think about the track for Unit 3. Unit 4 is now on an independent path from Unit 3,” Fanning said.

—Aaron Larson is POWER’s executive editor (@AaronL_Power, @POWERmagazine).

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Leveling the Market Playing Field for Hybrid Power Plants https://www.powermag.com/leveling-the-market-playing-field-for-hybrid-power-plants/ Thu, 29 Jul 2021 14:13:10 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165903 The post Leveling the Market Playing Field for Hybrid Power Plants appeared first on POWER Magazine.


The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is an independent agency that, among other things, regulates the interstate transmission of electricity. Its ultimate mission is to “Assist consumers in obtaining economically efficient, safe, reliable, and secure energy services at a reasonable cost through appropriate regulatory and market means, and collaborative efforts.” In the past, FERC has […]

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The post Leveling the Market Playing Field for Hybrid Power Plants appeared first on POWER Magazine.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is an independent agency that, among other things, regulates the interstate transmission of electricity. Its ultimate mission is to “Assist consumers in obtaining economically efficient, safe, reliable, and secure energy services at a reasonable cost through appropriate regulatory and market means, and collaborative efforts.”

In the past, FERC has issued important orders, including 841 and 2222, which have helped clear the way for more energy storage to be added to the U.S. power grid. However, Chip Cannon, a partner with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, who heads the firm’s energy regulation, markets, and enforcements practice, believes the playing field requires further leveling for hybrid plants, that is, facilities pairing solar or wind farms with battery storage.

Cannon said few hybrid plants existed on the grid a few years ago, but that is changing quickly. In fact, he said there are 102 GW of solar plus storage and 11 GW of wind plus storage capacity in the interconnection queue at the present time. “We have battery storage resources, typically paired with renewables, that are entering the interconnection queue at a very, very fast clip,” Cannon said as a guest on The POWER Podcast.

That has created some challenges for the market. “The queue process has not really been set up for accommodating these hybrid resources, and we really don’t have very much experience for them in the market,” said Cannon.

Hybrid plants offer a number of physical and operational traits that benefit the power grid. Solar and wind resources are obviously intermittent, meaning they only produce power when the sun shines and the wind blows. When paired with energy storage, which can be used to either add or remove energy to and from the grid, intermittency problems can be alleviated. The pairing also improves reliability, flexibility, and resiliency, and can help lower costs for consumers.

Cannon explained that all of the regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system operators (ISOs), such as PJM, CAISO, and NYISO, establish the “rules of the road” for generators to participate in their energy capacity and ancillary services markets. “But those market rules were not designed to reflect resources that can both take in energy as well as put energy on the grid. So, the concern here right now is that the market designs were simply not set up to accommodate energy storage resources,” Cannon said.

While FERC doesn’t have the authority to establish rules that promote energy storage, it can look at the existing market rules to see if they are unduly hindering the ability of certain classes of resources to participate and compete in those markets. Cannon said FERC has held a technical conference regarding hybrid resources, which allowed various stakeholders to provide input. It also directed RTOs and ISOs earlier this year to submit information on how their markets are setup to accommodate hybrid resources. Cannon suggested it will be interesting to see how FERC ultimately addresses the issue.

“We’re definitely at an inflection point in the power sector. I think the power sector has been going through an evolution for a couple of decades since FERC started going down the path of competition, and now we’ve got this radically new resource mix,” Cannon said. “I’m of the view, though, that the evolution is really turning into a revolution of the power sector with the speed of technological changes and falling prices. So, there’s a lot of really good stuff out there.”

To hear the full interview, which includes more about policies and how the change in presidential administration could alter activities within the FERC, listen to The POWER Podcast. Click on the SoundCloud player below to listen in your browser now or use the following links to reach the show page of your favorite podcast platform:

For more power podcasts, visit The POWER Podcast archives.

—Aaron Larson is POWER’s executive editor (@AaronL_Power, @POWERmagazine).

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Exelon Set to Decommission Illinois Nuclear Plants https://www.powermag.com/exelon-set-to-decommission-illinois-nuclear-plants/ Thu, 29 Jul 2021 04:29:38 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165883 The post Exelon Set to Decommission Illinois Nuclear Plants appeared first on POWER Magazine.


Exelon Generation has filed plans to decommission its Dresden and Byron nuclear power plants in Illinois, citing a lack of action from state lawmakers on clean energy legislation that would help save the facilities. The nation’s largest operator of nuclear power plants on July 28 said it has submitted its plans to the Nuclear Regulatory […]

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The post Exelon Set to Decommission Illinois Nuclear Plants appeared first on POWER Magazine.

Exelon Generation has filed plans to decommission its Dresden and Byron nuclear power plants in Illinois, citing a lack of action from state lawmakers on clean energy legislation that would help save the facilities.

The nation’s largest operator of nuclear power plants on July 28 said it has submitted its plans to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which will set in motion the final steps to retire the decades-old plants. The company in a statement said, “The filings are among the final steps in retiring the plants, which face revenue shortfalls in the hundreds of millions of dollars due to low energy prices and market policies that give fossil fuel plants an unfair competitive advantage. Absent a legislative solution, these same market inequities will force the company to close its Braidwood and LaSalle nuclear facilities sometime in the next few years.”

The Bryon Generating Station could be shut down within weeks after Exelon Generation filed decommissioning plans with the NRC on July 28. The plant has operated outside of Chicago since 1985. Courtesy: Exelon

The filings are known as the post-shutdown decommissioning activities report, or PSDAR. Exelon last year had announced that it was prepared to close the two nuclear plants due to poor economics. An Exelon spokesman on Wednesday said the company continues to hope that lawmakers will pass legislation that could keep the plants in operation, but said the company must begin the process of closing the plants.

“We understand that lawmakers continue to work on a legislative solution that would preserve Illinois’ nuclear fleet and we remain hopeful that clean energy legislation will pass in time for us to reverse these actions,” spokesman Paul Adams said in a statement. “However, without any certainty that a bill will pass, we must proceed with taking the final steps toward shutting down the plants, and that includes making regulatory filings such as the one we filed today with the NRC.”

Governor’s Energy Package

A spokesperson for Gov. J.B. Pritzker said the governor’s office has presented a “comprehensive energy package” to the legislature that would maintain jobs and put Illinois on a path to 100% clean energy by 2050. “The administration would hope the legislature will vote swiftly on this compromise bill that the governor would sign immediately,” the spokesperson said in a statement.

John Patterson, a spokesman for Don Harmon, president of the Illinois Senate, in a statement said, “Talks continue as everyone involved seeks to find the right balance for a future energy plan that is renewable, reliable and affordable. It’s a complex situation involving thousands of jobs, our climate future and every Illinoisans’ power bill, so clearly we want to get this right.”

Adams in his statement said Wednesday’s filing decision also is related to the need to refuel the plants, what he called a “complex” process costing “tens of millions of dollars” and requiring weeks to complete, with a need for more than 1,000 contract workers. “Whether to shut down or refuel is not a decision that can be made at the last minute, and we are currently just weeks away from Byron’s mid-September retirement date,” Adams said in his statement.

Dave Rhoades, Exelon Generation’s chief nuclear officer, in a statement said, “With no signs of a breakthrough on clean energy legislation in Springfield [the state capital], we have no choice but to take these final steps in preparation for shutting down the plants.”

The utility has said the 2,500-MW Byron Generating Station, located in Byron about 100 miles northwest of Chicago, would close in September. It entered commercial operation in 1985.

The Dresden Generating Station, an 1,800-MW plant located in Morris, about 62 miles southwest of Chicago, would shut down in November. The Dresden plant’s two remaining units have operated since 1970 and 1971, respectively.

Workers Notified of Job Losses

Exelon Generation said it is preparing to issue job reduction notifications to employees impacted by the plant shutdowns. The company in a statement said staffing at the plants, about 1,500 workers a year ago, will drop to just 30 to 40 employees over the next 10 years. State lawmakers have said they will continue to work on legislation to keep the Byron, Dresden, Braidwood, and LaSalle plants operating, as part of a state plan to grow clean energy generation and jobs in Illinois.

“We will never stop fighting for policies to preserve Illinois’ nuclear fleet, knowing that the minute these plants close our customers will experience dirtier air and higher energy costs,” said Rhoades. “But with time running out, we must plan for the future and do everything we can to prepare our employees and the communities they serve for what lies ahead.” Exelon said the plants support 28,000 direct and indirect jobs, and contribute about $3.5 billion each year to the state’s economy.

PJM, the regional grid operator, earlier said both Byron and Dresden could close without putting overall grid reliability at risk. Exelon Generation as part of the decommissioning process has up to 60 years to restore Byron and Dresden, which includes transporting the stations’ used fuel to long-term storage, decontaminating and removing plant components, and razing the remaining buildings.

—Darrell Proctor is a senior associate editor for POWER (@POWERmagazine).

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Biden Signs National Security Memo Addressing Industrial Control System Cybersecurity https://www.powermag.com/biden-signs-national-security-memo-addressing-industrial-control-system-cybersecurity/ Wed, 28 Jul 2021 21:01:38 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165873 The post Biden Signs National Security Memo Addressing Industrial Control System Cybersecurity appeared first on POWER Magazine.


The Biden administration is moving to add more safeguards to the nation’s critical infrastructure by establishing a new voluntary public-private collaboration that will focus wholly on industrial control systems (ICS) cybersecurity. The administration formally launched the “Industrial Control Systems Cybersecurity Initiative” in the “National Security Memorandum on Improving Cybersecurity for Critical Infrastructure Control Systems” signed by […]

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The post Biden Signs National Security Memo Addressing Industrial Control System Cybersecurity appeared first on POWER Magazine.

The Biden administration is moving to add more safeguards to the nation’s critical infrastructure by establishing a new voluntary public-private collaboration that will focus wholly on industrial control systems (ICS) cybersecurity.

The administration formally launched the “Industrial Control Systems Cybersecurity Initiative” in the “National Security Memorandum on Improving Cybersecurity for Critical Infrastructure Control Systems” signed by President Biden on July 28.

The collaboration between the federal government and the critical infrastructure community will work to defend the nation’s critical infrastructure—including its power plants and electric grid facilities—by “encouraging and facilitating the deployment of technologies and systems that provide threat visibility, indications, detection, and warnings, and that facilitate response capabilities for cybersecurity in essential control system and operational technology networks,” the memo says. “The goal of the Initiative is to greatly expand deployment of these technologies across priority critical infrastructure.”

The memorandum’s issuance is the federal government’s latest attempt to mitigate an ever-expanding landscape of cybersecurity attacks, but its cross-sectoral focus on critical infrastructure is notable because federal cybersecurity regulation in the U.S. has so far been sector-specific. Last week, for example, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Transportation Security Administration (TSA) announced a second security directive for critical pipeline owners and operators in response to the Colonial Pipeline Co. ransomware attack.

While TSA’s first directive, issued this May, required pipeline owners and operators to report confirmed and potential cybersecurity to the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the second directive mandates that they implement cybersecurity mitigation measures; develop a Cybersecurity Contingency Response Plan in the event of an incident; and undergo an annual cybersecurity architecture design review, among other things.

“We have a patchwork of sector-specific statutes that have been adopted piecemeal, as data security threats in particular sectors have gained public attention,” the White House said on Wednesday. “Given the evolving threat we face today, we must consider new approaches, both voluntary and mandatory.”

Power Sector Led ICS Cybersecurity Pilot

The new memorandum is also significant because it marks the end of the administration’s “100-day” plan, an initiative launched on April 20 to help owners and operators of ICS systems across the power sector to “identify and deploy” technologies and systems that could enable “near real-time” situational awareness and response capabilities in critical ICS operational technology (OT) networks.

While the Department of Energy (DOE) has provided scant details about what the “plan” specifically achieved during its rollout period, it suggested the power industry worked with the DOE’s Office of Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response (CESER) and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA).

Shedding more details on the 100-day efforts, the White House on Wednesday revealed that 150 electricity utilities have so far “either began deploying or have agreed to deploy control system cybersecurity technologies” to provide enhanced visibility into ICS and OT network vulnerabilities.

The Edison Electric Institute (EEI), a trade group that represents all U.S. investor-owned power companies, confirmed that more than 85% of its member companies that own and operate “prioritized control systems” are already participating. It also suggested that the deployment of sensors was a key facet of the electric subsector’s effort. “While individual companies monitor [ICS] systems, deploying sensors across the electric power sector will provide additional insights and enhance the government-industry partnership,” EEI said.

The newly established ICS initiative will now follow the electricity subsector pilot with “similar efforts” for natural gas pipelines, the White House said. The water and wastewater sector, and the chemical sector, will also deploy similar efforts later this year, it said.

“We cannot address threats we cannot see; therefore, deploying systems and technologies that can monitor control systems to detect malicious activity and facilitate response actions to cyber threats is central to ensuring the safe operations of these critical systems,” the White House said. “The Federal Government will work with industry to share threat information for priority control system critical infrastructure throughout the country.”

DHS to Issue Cybersecurity Performance Goals for Control Systems

Wednesday’s National Memorandum also directs the secretaries of Homeland Security, Commerce (through the National Institute of Standards and Technology), and other agencies to develop and issue cybersecurity performance goals for critical infrastructure. These measures will “further a common understanding of the baseline security practices that critical infrastructure owners and operators should follow to protect national and economic security, as well as public health and safety,” it said.Â

DHS will kick off the effort by issuing preliminary goals for control systems across all critical infrastructure sectors by Sept. 22, 2021. That will be followed by final cross-sector control system goals (and if necessary, sector-specific goals) by August 2022.

“These performance goals should serve as clear guidance to owners and operators about cybersecurity practices and postures that the American people can trust and should expect for such essential services,” the memorandum reads. “That effort may also include an examination of whether additional legal authorities would be beneficial to enhancing the cybersecurity of critical infrastructure, which is vital to the American people and the security of our Nation.”

The new initiative has so far received industry support. “With the performance guidelines, we’re developing some actionable ideas on [bulk electric system] security and security for all critical infrastructure sectors. It’s a challenge to develop clear performance goals, but I think when done well—like many of the North American Reliability Corp.’s Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards—they can be very effective,” Tobias Whitney, vice president of Industry Relations and Regulatory Affairs at Fortress Information Security, told POWER

However, as Whitney noted, much remains undetermined. “It will be very interesting to see with chemicals, water, pipelines, and how those sectors respond,” he said. “Will the guidelines be sector-specific or more general? And if they are general, will the electric industry’s guidelines be the model? I think they should be sector-specific, but there is a lot each sector can learn from the work that the energy companies have done to secure themselves.”

—Sonal Patel is a POWER senior associate editor (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine)

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Data Breaches Cost More Than $4 Million Per Incident, Power Industry at High Risk https://www.powermag.com/data-breaches-cost-more-than-4-million-per-incident-power-industry-at-high-risk/ Wed, 28 Jul 2021 11:38:35 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165850 The post Data Breaches Cost More Than $4 Million Per Incident, Power Industry at High Risk appeared first on POWER Magazine.


IBM Security reported on July 28 that the average cost of recent data breaches was $4.24 million per incident, the highest cost ever recorded by the company in 17 years of tracking the metric. Notably, data breaches in the U.S. were by far the costliest, exceeding $9 million per incident on average. The findings were […]

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The post Data Breaches Cost More Than $4 Million Per Incident, Power Industry at High Risk appeared first on POWER Magazine.

IBM Security reported on July 28 that the average cost of recent data breaches was $4.24 million per incident, the highest cost ever recorded by the company in 17 years of tracking the metric. Notably, data breaches in the U.S. were by far the costliest, exceeding $9 million per incident on average.

The findings were among several insights exposed through a global study of data breaches conducted by the independent Ponemon Institute, a analysis group known for its empirical studies. Researchers reviewed data breaches experienced by 537 organizations between May 2020 and March 2021. The incidents occurred in 17 countries and across various industries.

“We see the number, in general, tick up across the years—some years a little bit higher, some years a little lower—but in general, the trend has been the numbers increase over time,” IBM Cyber Threat Intelligence Expert Charles DeBeck told POWER during an exclusive interview. “I would still say that it was a pretty significant increase year over year here.”

Surprisingly, the average cost of data breaches in the Energy industry declined from $6.39 million per incident in the 2020 report to $4.65 million per incident this year. Still, Energy ranked fifth highest of the 17 industries tallied in the study.

Remote Work Adversely Affects Cost

Among the reasons DeBeck cited for higher costs overall this year compared to last was the increased number of people working from home as a result of COVID-19. In fact, the study found the cost to be $1.07 million higher on average for incidents in which remote work was a factor behind the breach compared to those in which it was not.

“We saw a significant increase for organizations that were breached after having gone through a significant remote work transition during the pandemic,” he said. “I think that was a really interesting component that I think was probably one of the leading factors that really pushed the overall data breach cost higher this year, among other factors.”

IBM said many businesses were forced to quickly adapt their technology approaches last year, with many companies encouraging or requiring employees to work from home, and 60% of organizations moving further into cloud-based activities during the pandemic. The findings suggest that security may have lagged behind these rapid IT changes, hindering organizations’ ability to respond to data breaches.

“One of the key reasons here was possibly because organizations needed to stand up a lot of infrastructure and a lot of capability very, very quickly with remote work. So, this wasn’t something where organizations sat back and thought to themselves, ‘Well, let’s do remote work slowly and safely.’ They pretty much said, ‘Okay, you’ve got a week, set up everything you can set up as quickly as possible, because nobody’s coming to the office starting on Monday,’ ” DeBeck explained. “For a lot of organizations, that sort of high-speed infrastructure and distributed capability setup, led to security doing the best they could, but ultimately, really struggling to keep up with the massive changes that organizations faced.”

Compromised Credentials Lead to Data Breaches

The study found that stolen user credentials were the most common root cause of malicious breaches. Additionally, customer personal data, such as names, email addresses, and passwords, were the most common types of information exposed in data breaches, with 44% of breaches including this type of data. IBM suggested the combination of these factors could cause a spiraling effect, with breaches of user names and passwords providing attackers with leverage for additional future data breaches.

“Organizations have started to realize that credentials are a major issue,” DeBeck said. “We’re really seeing a shift more broadly that organizations now are recognizing it’s really tough to keep your credentials protected and secure across the board, and you’re better off assuming that some amount of credentials are going to be lost, but minimizing the value of those credentials if they’re compromised. Multi-factor authentication is a great method here. Zero-trust, I think, is the other key idea here—making it so that even if somebody is able to get credentials for one machine, they’re not able to use that machine to leverage it into access throughout the organization based on zero-trust foundation relationships, making it so that the organization protects itself, not only from external aggression, but also from compromised internal machines or devices.”

Time to Detect Breaches Increased, AI Could Help

The study found the average time to detect and contain a data breach was 287 days (212 to detect, 75 to contain), which was one week longer than in the 2020 report. Notably, the time to identify and contain breaches has increased every year since 2017.

However, artificial intelligence (AI) and security automation can help reduce the time to detect and contain breaches, and cut their costs. In fact, having a fully deployed security automation system was found to reduce the average cost of breaches by almost a third, to $2.90 million per incident.

“The idea here is that artificial intelligence is really helpful in looking at large datasets, and disparate datasets, and finding correlations or potential areas of interest that would be challenging for a human to do,” DeBeck explained. He said AI can quickly assess a large number of data points and flag items that should be more closely evaluated by an expert. “Then, you can have a human with actual eyes on panel and hands on keyboard go through those instances and say, ‘Okay, this matters, this doesn’t. Here’s what I need to flag. Here’s what I can ignore.’ And so, artificial intelligence helps drive those operations more quickly, so that actual humans can do their job more effectively.”

Automated security orchestration is another component that can make a difference. “Automation can actually factor into both components—both in the identification component, as well as the containing component,” said DeBeck. He explained that automated components can insert mitigation measures, so breaches get addressed promptly, almost in real time. When alerts are sent to a person for resolution, the process of mitigating the breach can be delayed while the individual responsible for taking action is off duty or tackling other work-related matters. An automated system, meanwhile, is normally available and ready to act around the clock. “I think that’s the big advantage of automation is it speeds up both identification and containing of potential breaches,” DeBeck said.

—Aaron Larson is POWER’s executive editor (@AaronL_Power, @POWERmagazine).

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EPA Will Strengthen Limits on Wastewater Pollution from Coal-Fired Plants https://www.powermag.com/epa-will-strengthen-limits-on-wastewater-pollution-from-coal-fired-plants/ Tue, 27 Jul 2021 16:28:52 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165805 The post EPA Will Strengthen Limits on Wastewater Pollution from Coal-Fired Plants appeared first on POWER Magazine.


The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is set to establish more stringent standards on water pollution from coal-fired power plants. The EPA on July 26 announced it would reinstate Obama-era regulations that were rolled back by the Trump administration. An EPA official on Monday said the new rule would impact about 100 coal-fired plants. The agency […]

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The post EPA Will Strengthen Limits on Wastewater Pollution from Coal-Fired Plants appeared first on POWER Magazine.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is set to establish more stringent standards on water pollution from coal-fired power plants. The EPA on July 26 announced it would reinstate Obama-era regulations that were rolled back by the Trump administration.

An EPA official on Monday said the new rule would impact about 100 coal-fired plants. The agency said it would begin the rule-making process to reduce pollution, including toxic metals such as mercury, arsenic and selenium, though changes could take a few years to go into effect—meaning the current standards, which include dozens of environmental regulations that were weakened by the Trump EPA—will remain in place. Â

Monday’s action in particular addresses a rule finalized on Aug. 31 of last year, when the EPA moved to limit the number of power generation facilities that could incur costs for failing to comply with limits on pollution. Last year’s action revised a 2015 rule, when for the first time the EPA issued an order that set federal limits on the levels of toxic metals in wastewater that could be discharged from power plants.

The EPA on Monday said it intends to issue a proposed rule for public comment in the fall of 2022, with an eye toward finalizing the rule by late 2023 or early 2024.

Mercury, Arsenic, Selenium

EPA Administrator Michael Regan in a statement Monday said the agency would “quickly move to strengthen water quality protections and further reduce power plant pollution that can contain toxic metals such as mercury, arsenic, and selenium. EPA is committed to science-based policy decisions to protect our natural resources and public health.”

President Biden during his first week in office in January directed all federal agencies to review rules issued in the past four years under the Trump administration. He specifically asked agencies to assess whether those rules are consistent with the new administration’s policy to “listen to science, improve public health and protect the environment, [ensure] access to clean air and water, [limit] exposure to dangerous chemicals and pesticides, [hold] polluters accountable” and reduce greenhouse gases while bolstering climate change resilience.

Joel Johnston, an attorney at national law firm Hall Estill who specializes in environmental and regulatory issues and large infrastructure projects, in an email to POWER said, “The announcement these rules will be revised isn’t surprising. The Biden administration was clear upfront that it had a focus on climate change and environmental justice. It is hard to predict whether the revised wastewater rules will go farther than the prior Obama-era rules did to curb the discharge of coal plant wastes, or not, but with the current Trump-era rules left in place for now, it is business as usual on the discharge side.”

Johnston said “it is certain” that any new rules will lower the “allowable limits of contaminants in discharged wastewater … with an almost certain focus on those compounds most closely associated with coal power generation. I would also anticipate substantially strengthened compliance reporting obligations. In terms of the extent and types of plant infrastructure upgrades and capital projects that will be required to meet the future new rules, it’s largely unknown until there is some certainty as to what the rules will ultimately be changed to, so that does create a great deal of business and regulatory uncertainty. There will be a lot more to say when the draft rules come out in fall 2022, though industry and environmental stakeholders will certainly be working tirelessly in the interim to get their respective positions heard.”

Review of 2020 Rule

The EPA in a news release Monday said the agency “undertook a science-based review of the 2020 Steam Electric Reconsideration Rule under Executive Order (E.O.) 13990, finding that there are opportunities to strengthen certain wastewater pollution discharge limits. For example, treatment systems using membranes continue to rapidly advance as an effective option for treating a wide variety of industrial pollution, including from steam electric power plants. EPA expects this technology to continue advancing and the agency will evaluate its availability as part of the new rule-making.”

Radhika Fox, the lead water official at the EPA, told the Washington Post, “What we found is that the Trump administration’s 2020 rule really is lacking. We think that we can do better when it comes to reducing water pollution from coal power plants.”

Several utilities that operate coal-fired power plants earlier this year called for regulators to lock in permits under last year’s less-stringent pollution standards, in part to provide more certainty to wastewater rules and limit the need to make expensive environmental upgrades to power plants. Environmentalists, meanwhile, have been asking for swifter changes from the Biden administration to revise rules enacted by Trump’s EPA.

Wary of Court Action

The EPA on Monday, in addressing the timeline for toughening the pollution rules, said it did not want a court to order a revision back to even-earlier rules, perhaps as far back as 1982.

“The current requirements provide significant environmental protections relative to a 1982 rule that would otherwise be in effect,” the EPA wrote in its news release. “The 2015 and 2020 rules are leading to better control of water pollution from power plants while reducing the cost of controls such as biological treatment systems and membrane treatment systems. The agency’s approach will secure progress made by the 2015 and 2020 rules while the agency undertakes a new rule-making to consider more stringent requirements.”

Environmentalists, though, decried the fact that toxic wastewater can continue to flow into waterways near coal-fired plants for even a few more years.

“If their timeline is 2024, that’s four years of damage,” Brett Hartl, government affairs director at the Center for Biological Diversity, told the Washington Post. “he industry is getting the better end of the deal out of this.” Â

Hartl told CNN: “Oftentimes in these rules, the agencies often have a compliance phase in period. It may not be implemented by 2025 or 2026. We’re stuck in a world where really important protections for people are being slow-walked and that’s just not sufficient.”

Katie Sweeney, executive vice president at the National Mining Association, which represents coal-mining companies, in a statement that while her group is “disappointed that the new administration has decided to reconsider the 2020 rule … we look forward to engaging with EPA” in helping shape new regulations. Power companies would like a role in determining new rules as well.

Quin Shea, vice president for environment, natural resources, and occupational safety at the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), which represents investor-owned electric utilities, in a statement said EEI “looks forward to working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on ways to continue the industry’s clean-energy transformation as the agency works to implement the existing technical requirements.”

—Darrell Proctor is a senior associate editor for POWER (@POWERmagazine).

Â

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G20 Environment Ministers: No Consensus on Phasing Out Coal https://www.powermag.com/g20-environment-ministers-no-consensus-on-phasing-out-coal/ Sun, 25 Jul 2021 16:36:54 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165669 The post G20 Environment Ministers: No Consensus on Phasing Out Coal appeared first on POWER Magazine.


The U.S., UK and other countries want world governments to commit to a phaseout of the use and financing of coal-fired power generation, but officials who met at the G20 Environment Ministers Meeting summit in Naples, Italy, this past week ended their talks without an agreement on the future of the fuel. The topic will […]

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The post G20 Environment Ministers: No Consensus on Phasing Out Coal appeared first on POWER Magazine.

The U.S., UK and other countries want world governments to commit to a phaseout of the use and financing of coal-fired power generation, but officials who met at the G20 Environment Ministers Meeting summit in Naples, Italy, this past week ended their talks without an agreement on the future of the fuel.

The topic will come up again at the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP26, in Glasgow, Scotland, later this year. The talks in Italy, which ended July 23, showed the difficulty among developed nations in reaching a consensus on carbon emissions, with coal-fired power still a dominant part of the energy mix in many countries.

The International Energy Agency (IEA) earlier this month reported that coal-fired generation is experiencing a resurgence this year after the pandemic-driven drop in 2020. The IEA has projects 3% growth in the construction of new coal-fired facilities in 2022. China is among the countries with several new coal plants either planned or under construction.

China, India Building New Coal-Fired Plants

The use of coal for power generation has been declining in the U.S. and across most of Europe for several years. But even as China, the world’s largest carbon emitter, and India increase their use of renewable energy resources, they continue to build new coal-fired generation—and work to keep existing plants running—as the countries continue to face increased demand for power.

According to “Yale Environment 360,” published by a group at Yale University, China put 38.4 GW of new coal-fired power generation into operation last year, more than three times the amount of new coal capacity that came online in the rest of the world.

The U.S. and Great Britain are driving efforts to stop construction of new coal plants in order to limit global warming. “It is frustrating that despite the progress made by some countries, there was no consensus in Naples to confine coal to history,” Alok Sharma, the British official who will lead the COP26 meeting in November, said in a statement.

Challenges to Paris Accord

Reports from last week’s summit said several countries, including India, China, and Russia, objected to the inclusion of language about ending the use of coal in the meeting’s communique. Climate scientists are mostly in agreement that the used of coal-fired power worldwide must be reduced in order to have any chance of meeting the goals of the 2015 Paris climate accord, which called for limiting the global temperature rise to 1.5C (2.7F) above pre-industrial levels.

The National Centers for Environmental Information, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in a recent report said the June 2021 average global surface temperature was the fifth-highest for June since global recordkeeping began in 1880. The group said North America had its “highest June temperature departure [from normal readings] on record,” with Asia’s June 2021 temperature departure tied with 2010 as the second-highest for the month on record.

The contiguous U.S. had its warmest June on record, as did Africa and New Zealand, while Europe had its second-warmest June on record.

“The most important thing is getting off of coal as fast as we can,” John Kerry, the U.S. special climate envoy, told the UK’s BBC News in the run-up to last week’s meeting. “There are countries that are still bringing coal online that could be building out greater renewable and alternative, sustainable energy possibilities.”

Substitutes for coal, with less environmental impact, are being introduced as a way to keep coal-fired power plants operating, while utilities continue to convert coal units to burn natural gas, both in the U.S. and Canada among other countries.

Climate Change Targets

The UK government in April set what it called “the world’s most ambitious climate change target,” a law designed to reduce emissions by 78% by 2035 compared to 1990 levels. The UK in a release after last week’s summit said the environment ministers did agree to “accelerate action” this decade on climate change initiatives and develop strategies to keep the targets of the Paris accord in reach.

UK officials also said they want nations to make new pledges to cut emissions ahead of the November meeting. The U.S. and European Union already have announced new targets; the Biden administration in April said it wanted to achieve at least a 50% reduction in greenhouse gases by 2030, compared to 2005 levels, across the economy. Â

China and India, though, are among the nations that have not revised their pledges under the Paris accord, according to the environment ministers.

—Darrell Proctor is a senior associate editor for POWER (@POWERmagazine).

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Five Steps to Streamlined Asset Management and a Sustainable Network https://www.powermag.com/five-steps-to-streamlined-asset-management-and-a-sustainable-network/ Fri, 23 Jul 2021 14:58:19 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165610 The post Five Steps to Streamlined Asset Management and a Sustainable Network appeared first on POWER Magazine.


How do utility asset managers deal with risks and failures of assets in the long-term? How much should they be budgeting for maintenance, asset renewal, and investments? The answers are not always obvious for asset managers that are faced with increasingly severe weather and the need for strengthened electrical grids. Another layer of unpredictability is […]

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The post Five Steps to Streamlined Asset Management and a Sustainable Network appeared first on POWER Magazine.

How do utility asset managers deal with risks and failures of assets in the long-term? How much should they be budgeting for maintenance, asset renewal, and investments? The answers are not always obvious for asset managers that are faced with increasingly severe weather and the need for strengthened electrical grids. Another layer of unpredictability is added to the mix with policy in flux and changing public opinion on how we develop and consume energy. Although President Biden’s climate agenda may be shrinking and there isn’t a Green New Deal yet, utilities need to be prepared to shift to greener energy. Federal infrastructure negotiations also include electric grid improvements and a gradual shift to a carbon-free electric sector.

Because of these factors and more, asset managers no longer have the role of making decisions based solely on the perspective of one single aspect of the problem. Decision-making is complex and asset management is not linear, but a sum of practices with evolving contexts require even those most experienced asset managers to make adjustments.

Although the electric utility landscape is evolving rapidly, the basics of utility asset management are the same. The best place to start any asset management journey is by understanding long-term risks of failure and required budgets to manage these risks more effectively. Then, asset managers can create a vision for strategic asset management moving forward and ultimately achieve a sustainable network. Achieving a sustainable network means ensuring utilities continue to provide optimal service while facing multiple challenges and accommodating evolving regulatory requirements. Asset managers need to be able to make informed, data-driven investment decisions and determine the right operations maintenance practices for assets in different scenarios.

Three Basics of Utility Asset Management

It’s important to first understand the complexities of the industry and the solutions for successful utility asset management. Among the basics are:

  • Asset Management Requires Alignment Between Long-Term Vision and Near-Term Strategy. Oftentimes, asset managers have to focus on manpower and problems they can fix in the near term. In addition to putting out fires, thinking preventatively needs to be objectively linked to the day-to-day. Strategies to address the challenges faced by external stakeholders, the evolution of demand, and daily operations should be working together. Remember that asset management is a journey, and a sustainable network will not be achieved overnight.
  • There Are Three Key Factors of Asset Management—Risk, Cost, and Performance. Often referred to as a three-pronged scale, risk, cost, and performance all influence one another. Assessing the effect each has is essential to maintain the well-balanced scale. Risk monetization allows asset managers to estimate a necessary level of cost for risk mitigation plans.
  • The Asset Management System Is Not Just Maintenance, Operations, or Any Individual. The asset management system involves the whole utility and its consumers. This complexity is what makes asset management systems difficult to implement, and asset managers need to take a leadership role of all involved entities to make it work. The asset manager creates the system that allows specialized departments to collaborate to achieve cost, risk, and performance objectives.

Implementing an asset management system is important not only for streamlining day-to-day operations and meeting regulatory standards, but for avoiding disaster and being prepared when issues do arise. For example, if oil from a transformer spills into a body of water, the utility takes responsibility for necessary cleanup. Similarly, if a transformer catches fire, explodes, or has a gas leak, the utility will have to unexpectedly cover the cost of replacement. Lastly, if an outage is caused for any reason, the utility may be penalized based on the length of the interruption. Failures of all kinds are costly and create reputational risks, but risk-based asset management can help avoid these expensive occurrences by calculating the risks of aging assets, vegetation, and other contributing factors.

Although there will never be a direct line of sight into the future, data can be used to predict outcomes for assets including risk of failure. When done right, asset management can be a smooth process where spending money tactically on assets and asset maintenance saves money for the utility in the long run.

Five Steps Every Utility Asset Manager Should Follow

This is achieved with risk-based asset management, which can be broken down into the following five steps.

1. Define the Asset Failure Risk Assessment Methodology Adapted to the Organizational Context.

The asset failure modes are numerous, and so are their consequences on every challenge. An exhaustive study of all the risks would require an enormous amount of effort and time to carry out. Therefore, managers should choose a simplified and proven method, taking into account the major risks of failure and the major issues of all stakeholders.

Asset management is a journey, and utilities usually start by adopting a platform and methodology that will start generating value in a few weeks or a few months. As data becomes available the risk modeling can be improved.

2. Create an Asset Registry—Develop a List of Assets with Relevant Information.

Without an asset data register, there can be no failure risk study. The analysis of failure risk due to aging of the asset is calculated with data including the age of the asset, the aggressiveness of its direct environment, its duty rate, the history of failures, and associated costs. For the estimation of failure risk due to vegetation, data can come from various sources such as satellite or LiDAR (light detection and ranging). Post processing and computer vision techniques will allow a quantification of the risk caused by vegetation for easy decision-making. To be useable on a large scale, this data must be computerized and stored carefully in an accessible database.

3. Assess the Condition of Each Asset Using Specific Criteria for Each Asset Category and Determine the Probability of Failure (PoF) Based on Real Conditions.

An estimated probability of failure can be calculated with historic asset failure and predictive asset failure models combined with inspection data. In the framework of the asset failure risk assessment due to aging, utilities can work with aging models for each asset category. When using this method, it is necessary to assess the asset health using asset information as input of the method (Step 2) and deriving the annual probability of failure from the aging model of the asset category.

4. Determine the Consequence of Failure (CoF) for Each Asset Regarding Performance Targets in Relation to Service Reliability, Safety, Environment, and Direct Costs.

Does failure of that asset create a power outage? Could it start a fire or damage other assets and create explosion? Each asset failure creates several consequences. Some of them may be insignificant, while others are disastrous depending on what is impacted. Being able to monetize consequences of failure allows not only asset managers, but all stakeholders, to see asset failure in a new light.

5. Develop a Risk-Based Investment and Maintenance Strategy to Extract Greater Value from Infrastructure Assets.

At this point, it all comes down to the numbers. Once this strategy is in place, asset managers can analyze data to make well-informed decisions that result in optimal outcomes for the utility. Some use cases are more focused on the long term, such as planning for energy regulators or optimizing maintenance strategy for a given asset class. Others pay out more quickly, like clearing vegetation before fire season.

Implementing a System

There are solutions available to simplify the data so asset managers can save time and money with this process. Aplines, a Schneider Electric venture, has developed a solution, called Aptimize, that calculates risks and associated costs, and identifies the assets that have the most significant needs for maintenance or replacement, to help asset managers make their decisions more easily and justifiably. Workshops and training sessions are also available to help onboard asset managers to implement these steps using the ISO 55000 as the standard.

Taking responsibility for asset management means putting in the work to create a system that spreads out spending by analyzing risk and cost. Taking safety, environmental, and monetary factors into consideration provides asset managers the opportunity to create value for the utility and its customers in the long term, while streamlining their own work from day to day. Asset management is a complex role but doesn’t have to be a daunting one with the right data, partners, and systems in place.

—Xavier Loin is an asset management consultant with Aplines.

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FirstEnergy Federally Charged in Ohio Nuclear Bailout Scheme https://www.powermag.com/firstenergy-federally-charged-in-ohio-nuclear-bailout-scheme/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 17:25:24 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165526 The post FirstEnergy Federally Charged in Ohio Nuclear Bailout Scheme appeared first on POWER Magazine.


Facing a federal charge for honest services wire fraud in a corruption case related to the billion-dollar nuclear plant bailout in Ohio, FirstEnergy Corp. has agreed to abide by the terms of a three-year deferred prosecution settlement to get the charge dismissed. In court filings on July 22, the Akron, Ohio-based public utility holding company […]

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The post FirstEnergy Federally Charged in Ohio Nuclear Bailout Scheme appeared first on POWER Magazine.

Facing a federal charge for honest services wire fraud in a corruption case related to the billion-dollar nuclear plant bailout in Ohio, FirstEnergy Corp. has agreed to abide by the terms of a three-year deferred prosecution settlement to get the charge dismissed.

In court filings on July 22, the Akron, Ohio-based public utility holding company admitted it conspired with public officials and other individuals and entities to pay millions of dollars to Larry Householder, former Ohio House Speaker, through Generation Now, a 501(c)(4) organization, in exchange for passing a $1.3 billion bailout for its struggling Perry and Davis–Besse nuclear plants.Â

“Central to FirstEnergy Corp.’s effort to influence the legislative process in Ohio was the use of 501(c)(4) corporate entities,” the company said in a public statement issued on Thursday as part of the deferred prosecution agreement with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Ohio to resolve the Department of Justice investigation. “FirstEnergy Corp. used the 501(c)(4) corporate form as a mechanism to conceal payments for the benefit of public officials and in return for official action.”

Political Racketeering Scandal

The charge is the latest development in the political racketeering scandal which stemmed from Ohio’s abrupt passage and enactment of HB 6 in July 2019.

The law essentially provided FirstEnergy Solution’s (FES’s) 908-MW Davis-Besse and 1.3-GW Perry plants with an estimated $150 million a year during the 2021 to 2027 period to keep the reactors in service. (FES, which was FirstEnergy Corp.’s competitive arm, last year re-emerged from bankruptcy as an independent firm, Energy Harbor Corp.) Â

A federal investigation led to an 80-page criminal complaint, and the ultimate arrest of Householder and four lobbyists in July 2020. Householder in September 2020 pleaded not guilty to the charges. A FirstEnergy internal review meanwhile found former CEO Chuck Jones and two other company executives violated company policies in connection with the alleged bribery scheme. Jones was fired in October 2020.

On Thursday, the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Southern District of Ohio said FirstEnergy admitted that it used 501(c)(4) entities, including one it controlled, “to further the scheme because it allowed certain FirstEnergy Corp. executives and co-conspirators to conceal from the public the nature, source, and control of payments.”

FirstEnergy in its public statement said it used 501(c)(4) entities to influence the legislative process “because the law does not require disclosure of donors to a 501(c)(4), and there is no ceiling that limits the amount of expenditures that can be paid to a 501(c)(4) entity for the purpose of influencing the legislative process.” The effort would not have been possible—”both in the nature and volume of money provided”— without the use of a 501(c)(4) entity, it said.Â

The company also acknowledged that it paid $4.3 million dollars to a second public official. “In return, the individual acted in their official capacity to further FirstEnergy Corp.’s interests related to passage of nuclear legislation and other company priorities,” the attorney’s office said.

$230M Penalty, Full Cooperation Required for Dismissal of Charge

The U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday said FirstEnergy “has cooperated substantially with the government.” However, “the company must continue to cooperate fully with the U.S. in all matters related to the company’s conduct described in the agreement and other conduct under investigation by the government, among other obligations,” it said.

Under the agreement, FirstEnergy will be required to pay—within the next 60 days—$115 million to the U.S. government and $115 million to the Ohio Development Service Agency’s Percentage of Income Payment Plus Plan, a state program that provides assistance to Ohioans in paying their regulated utility bills.

FirstEnergy must also publicly disclose contributions to 501(c)(4) entities and “entities known by FirstEnergy Corp. to be operating for the benefit of a public official, either directly or indirectly, and making various provisions to improve corporate compliance moving forward.”

“As part of the agreement, FirstEnergy Corp. admitted to the facts alleged in the Information and outlined in the Statement of Facts, which detail actions by FirstEnergy Corp. executives to pay money to public officials in return for official action,” the attorney’s office said. “As a corporation, FirstEnergy Corp. is responsible for the acts of its current and former officers, directors, employees, and agents.”

FirstEnergy Pledges Culture of Compliance and Ethics

In a statement on Thursday, Donald T. Misheff, nonexecutive chairman of FirstEnergy’s board of directors, said FirstEnergy plans to fully cooperate with the U.S. Attorney’s Office. The company also plans a political engagement overhaul, he said.

“This resolution and the actions we have agreed to implement build on the substantial steps we have taken over the past several months to strengthen our leadership team, ensure we have a best-in-class compliance program, and significantly modify our approach to political engagement as we work to regain the trust of our stakeholders,” he said.

Steven E. Strah, FirstEnergy’s new president and CEO, meanwhile, said the company will “redouble” its commitment to live up to its core values and behaviors, which include “integrity, openness, and trust.” Moving forward, the company is “intently focused on fostering a strong culture of compliance and ethics, starting at the top, and ensuring we have robust processes in place to prevent the type of misconduct that occurred in the past.”

The company said it has already taken “substantial remedial actions across four broad categories,” including employment consequences for executives and employees who engaged in misconduct; enhancements to the company’s compliance program; improvements to the company’s policies and procedures; and monetary remediation to ratepayers.Â

Other specific efforts outlined by the government  in the resolution agreement as part of its decision to defer prosecution include:

  • Establishing an executive director role for the Board of Directors, which supports the development of enhanced controls and governance policies and procedures;
  • Hiring a new chief legal officer, who oversees the company’s legal and internal audit departments;
  • Separating the chief legal officer and chief ethics and compliance officer (CECO) functions, and hiring a new CECO who reports directly to the Audit Committee of the Board and administratively to the chief legal officer;
  • Working to establish a culture of ethics, integrity, and accountability at every level of the organization;
  • Creating a Compliance Oversight Subcommittee of the Audit Committee to implement compliance recommendations received from outside counsel; and
  • Reviewing and revising political activity and lobbying/consulting practices, including requiring robust disclosures about lobbying activities.

—Sonal Patel is a POWER senior associate editor (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine)

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American Clean Power and Energy Storage Associations Pursuing a Merger https://www.powermag.com/american-clean-power-and-energy-storage-associations-pursuing-a-merger/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 16:08:43 +0000 https://www.powermag.com/?p=165520 The post American Clean Power and Energy Storage Associations Pursuing a Merger appeared first on POWER Magazine.


renewable-energy-storage

The American Clean Power Association (ACP)—a 2021-launched pan-renewables trade group—may be poised to merge with the U.S. Energy Storage Association (ESA) starting on Jan. 1, 2022. The groups’ intent to pursue a merger, announced on July 22, still requires ESA’s member approval. If successful, it would combine the two trade association’s staff programs and members, […]

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The post American Clean Power and Energy Storage Associations Pursuing a Merger appeared first on POWER Magazine.

renewable-energy-storage

The American Clean Power Association (ACP)—a 2021-launched pan-renewables trade group—may be poised to merge with the U.S. Energy Storage Association (ESA) starting on Jan. 1, 2022.

The groups’ intent to pursue a merger, announced on July 22, still requires ESA’s member approval. If successful, it would combine the two trade association’s staff programs and members, and potentially expand the ACP’s reach into the dedicated energy storage group’s diverse membership. ESA currently has 200 members from companies that include independent power producers, electric utilities, energy service companies, financiers, insurers, law firms, installers, manufacturers, component suppliers, and integrators.

The ACP says it has 1,000 member companies and 120,000 members. The group launched in January 2021 as a pan-renewables group that “unifies” the wind, solar, storage, and transmission industries, though its core membership comprises former members of the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), a group with which it merged at the start of this year.

AWEA, which grew into a national trade association for the U.S. wind industry since it was established in 1974, in May 2019 announced it was moving toward a pan-renewables association when it unveiled CLEANPOWER, an exhibition hub that would incorporate utility-scale wind, solar, energy storage, and other clean energy technologies. The subsector event coalition would “create efficiencies for exhibitors and attendees with multi-technology business models,” it said.

During the inaugural CLEANPOWER event, which was held virtually last summer owing to the pandemic, AWEA joined forces with the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), National Hydropower Association (NHA), and ESA to release a set of joint advocacy principles that sought more collaboration. Their vision, notably, also laid out principles to boost renewable generation so that it would make up the majority of U.S. power generation by 2030. The principles also push for a “more resilient, efficient, sustainable, and affordable grid; achieving carbon reductions; and advancing greater competition through fair market rules.”

ACP’s newly announced intent to merge with ESA will “enhance the American Clean Power Association’s efforts to advocate for the economic and environmental advantages of the clean power economy and further position the renewable energy and storage industries for success as they move into a decade of transformative growth,” it said on Thursday.

“Energy storage is foundational to a cleaner energy future for the country,” said Jim Murphy, president of Invenergy and the chairman of the board for ACP. “Joining together with ESA strengthens the unified voice of the clean power industry as we continue to transform the U.S. power grid to a low-cost, reliable, and renewable power system.”

According to Kiran Kumaraswamy, vice president of Market Applications at energy storage firm Fluence and the chair of ESA’s board, the merger kicks off “a powerful new chapter for our industry and a pathway to achieving 100 GW of new energy storage by 2030.” The ESA Board of Directors is “confident that a merger will elevate advocacy, research, and educational efforts on behalf of the energy storage industry, with significant benefits and expanded opportunities for ESA’s staff and membership,” she said.

Renewables Powerhouses

An expansion of the ACP could amplify the trade group’s voice in the state and federal environment, where major initiatives are underway to reshape the U.S. power sector with a renewables backbone. “Our goal is to make clean energy the dominant electricity source in the United States,” the group explains. “ACP gives a voice to the renewable power sector to speak at a time when renewable investments can help rebuild our economy and address climate change.”

Another well-known pan-renewables group, the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE), has since 2001 advocated for similar renewables priorities, backed by members that include developers, manufacturers, financial institutions, corporate renewable energy buyers, grid technology providers, utilities, professional service firms, academic institutions, and allied nonprofit groups. ACORE has said it “accomplishes much of its work by convening key stakeholders, facilitating partnerships, educating senior officials on important policies, publishing research and analysis on pressing issues, and undertaking strategic outreach on the policies and financial structures essential to renewable energy growth.”

ACORE and ACP are also separately lobbying for similar outcomes on the federal scene. Their priorities echo key ambitions expressed by the Biden administration—specifically a call for a nationwide 100% carbon-free power target by 2035.

Joining Forces as Washington Deliberates the Nation’s Future Energy Direction

The Biden administration is currently spearheading several measures to overhaul the nation’s infrastructure. While President Biden struck a deal with a bipartisan group of senators earlier this month on a $579 billion package dubbed the “Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework,” the package is a scaled-back version of the president’s proposed American Jobs Plan. However, it envisions $73 billion for power infrastructure, including for “thousands of miles of new, resilient transmission lines to facilitate the expansion of renewable energy” through a new Grid Authority. Negotiations on the package have dragged on for weeks, though the bipartisan senators on Wednesday said they have made “significant progress and are close to a final agreement.”

On July 14, meanwhile, the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources advanced an energy infrastructure package—“the Energy Infrastructure Act”—by a 13–7 vote, with Sen. Steve Daines (R-Mont.), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), and Bill Cassidy (R-La.) voting with Democrat senators in favor of the bill. Sponsored by Committee Chairman Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), the measure could serve as legislative text for key portions of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework, including power infrastructure, Western water, resilience, abandoned mine lands, and orphan wells.

An amended version of the bill authorizes more than $100 billion for grid reliability and resilience, a transmission expansion, and the demonstration of emerging technologies, including electric-vehicle battery second-life applications for grid services; rare earth elements; energy storage technologies; advanced reactor projects; carbon capture projects; and, in a legislative first, hydrogen development.

—Sonal Patel is a POWER senior associate editor (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine)

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Lec 14: Biot-Savart Law | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2002 (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72P9wQeuf3Y Sat, 13 Dec 2014 09:32:40 +0000 yt:video:72P9wQeuf3Y

Biot-Savart Law – Gauss’ Law for Magnetic Fields –
Revisit the "Leyden Jar" – High-Voltage Power Lines

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Biot-Savart Law – Gauss’ Law for Magnetic Fields –
Revisit the "Leyden Jar" – High-Voltage Power Lines

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Lec 13: Moving Charges in B-fields | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2002 (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeGs4Eec_lc Sat, 13 Dec 2014 08:32:25 +0000 yt:video:PeGs4Eec_lc

Moving Charges in B-fields – Cyclotron – Synchrotron – Mass Spectrometer – Cloud Chamber

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Moving Charges in B-fields – Cyclotron – Synchrotron – Mass Spectrometer – Cloud Chamber

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Lec 12: Review Exam 1 (Secret Top!) | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2002 (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOAwbtnnXVw Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:53:02 +0000 yt:video:bOAwbtnnXVw

Review for Exam 1 (Secret Top!)

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Review for Exam 1 (Secret Top!)

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Lec 11: Magnetic field and Lorentz Force | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4dXXnUMHbQ Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:45:14 +0000 yt:video:X4dXXnUMHbQ

Magnetic field
Lorentz Force – Torques – Electric Motors (DC) – Oscilloscope

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Magnetic field
Lorentz Force – Torques – Electric Motors (DC) – Oscilloscope

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is neither affiliated with nor endorsed by MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin.

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Lec 10: Batteries and EMF | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2002 (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-9KnN9k810 Wed, 10 Dec 2014 21:53:54 +0000 yt:video:1-9KnN9k810

Batteries – EMF – Energy Conservation – Power – Kirchhoff’s Rules – Circuits – Kelvin Water Dropper

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Batteries – EMF – Energy Conservation – Power – Kirchhoff’s Rules – Circuits – Kelvin Water Dropper

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Lec 09: Currents, Resistivity and Ohm’s Law | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imlqEKrfS-k Wed, 10 Dec 2014 21:41:23 +0000 yt:video:imlqEKrfS-k

Currents – Resistivity – Ohm’s Law

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Currents – Resistivity – Ohm’s Law

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Lec 08: Polarization and Dielectrics | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2002 (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcBCmIgqNII Wed, 10 Dec 2014 21:36:11 +0000 yt:video:wcBCmIgqNII

Polarization – Dielectrics – The Van de Graaff – More on Capacitors

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Polarization – Dielectrics – The Van de Graaff – More on Capacitors

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Lec 07: Capacitance and Field Energy | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2002 (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgE9oBDIgdc Wed, 10 Dec 2014 21:24:28 +0000 yt:video:PgE9oBDIgdc

Capacitance – Field Energy

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Capacitance – Field Energy

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Lec 06: High-Voltage Breakdown and Lightning | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heot2R99YNk Wed, 10 Dec 2014 21:17:33 +0000 yt:video:heot2R99YNk

High-Voltage Breakdown – Lightning – Sparks – St. Elmo’s Fire

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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High-Voltage Breakdown – Lightning – Sparks – St. Elmo’s Fire

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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Lec 05: Electrostatic Shielding (Faraday Cage) | 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism (Walter Lewin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79xMsqRp6dE Wed, 10 Dec 2014 18:53:16 +0000 yt:video:79xMsqRp6dE

E = -grad V – More on Equipotential Surfaces – Conductors – Electrostatic Shielding (Faraday Cage)

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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E = -grad V – More on Equipotential Surfaces – Conductors – Electrostatic Shielding (Faraday Cage)

This lecture is part of 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism, as taught in Spring 2002 by Dr. Walter Lewin at MIT.

This video was formerly hosted on the YouTube channel MIT OpenCourseWare.
This version was downloaded from the Internet Archive, at https://archive.org/details/MIT8.02S02/.

Attribution: MIT OpenCourseWare
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.
More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/.

This YouTube channel is independently operated. It is not affiliated with MIT, MIT OpenCourseWare, the Internet Archive, or Dr. Lewin, nor do they endorse any content on this channel.

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